Archive
Tag "Kirsten Luckins"
Tees Women Poets Storm the Fine Art World – again!

Tees Women Poets Storm the Fine Art World – again!

Apples and Snakes’ Regional Co-ordinator, Kirsten Luckins talks to us about her time running workshops, making poetry and kicking some serious (eye) balls with the Tees Women Poets at the Middlesborough Institute of Modern Art (that’s ‘mima’ to you!)

It was a real pleasure for me and the Tees Women Poets to be involved in another mima exhibition last weekend, as we’d been hoping for a return ever since our highly successful performance in the Louise Bourgeois exhibition last year.

The fab curatorial team at mima invited us (and many …

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A Week in Arvon: Erin Bolens

A Week in Arvon: Erin Bolens

At the start of the year, we teamed up with Arvon to give a group of our budding writers from Apples and Snakes’ The Writing Room the opportunity to take part in a week’s writing residency. The Writing Room offers a safe environment for young poets to write and share work with peers under the guidance of some of the UK’s top professional spoken word artists. Erin Bolens guest-blogs about her time at Arvon, Lumb Bank. 

I am writing this after three days of reacclimatising myself into the ways of …

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What Happens When you Give Video Cameras to Poets? (with Jo Colley)

As we prepare for the third annual Read Our Lips Filmpoem Competition, north-east coordinator Kirsten Luckins has a chat with the first ever winner, Jo Colley. Details of how to enter your filmpoem into this year’s competition can be found at the bottom of the page.

You won the 2013 Read Our Lips with ‘Dream On.’ Had you made many filmpoems before that one?
I had made two or three film poems before this one – but then there was a gap, and really I had lost confidence. The

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What Happens When You Give Video Cameras to Poets? (with Julie Egdell)

 

As we prepare for the third annual Read Our Lips Filmpoem Competition, north-east coordinator Kirsten Luckins has a chat with one of last year’s winners, Julie Egdell. Details of how to enter your filmpoem into this year’s competition can be found at the bottom of the page.

You won the prize for ‘Best First Film’ in 2014 with ‘Carly’s Downtime’ – what made you decide to make and enter a film?
I’m interested in poetry across art forms but always thought you needed funding and professionals to …

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